Parent & Teen

Hot Spots

Have parents and kids get to know each other better by including a “Hot Spot” column in your church or youth newsletter. In each newsletter, feature a biographical sketch of one young person and one parent. Group members can volunteer to be reporters and interview each “Hot Spot” person. Reporters can ask about unusual hobbies, dreams for the future, and one thing the featured people would like to tell their parents (or children). In addition to being a fun feature, these columns will help kids and parents understand each other better.

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Spirit-Filled Life For Student

Version: NKJV
Publisher: Nelson

There are boxed entries throughout the pages called “Kingdom Dynamics” that focus on 15 crucial Bible topics with the central goal of the subjects presented to relate “power points” of the Holy Spirit- filled life that touch on foundational precepts, life-releasing promises, relational priorities and practical power principles.

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Parent-Teenager Covenant

Plan a parent-teen meeting on the dangers of drug and alcohol abuse. Contact a local counselling centre. Ask for them to provide a guest speaker and resources for the meeting. First meet with parents and teens together and listen to the speaker. Then separate the youth and the parents. Each group gets a sheet of paper and pencil. Have each group write a covenant that covers two areas:
1.) What is considered a bad choice (i.e.: riding in car driven by drunk friend)
2.) What consequences should occur if a teen makes a bad choice (i.e.: not allowed to see friend for 1 month)
Gather parents and kids, compare the 2 versions and reach a compromise. Make copies of the covenant and give one to each family. Have all family members sign their covenant as a symbol of making responsible choices concerning alcohol and drugs. Then have a Teen-Parent Covenant, complete with consequences if a parent used alcohol or drugs.

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Parent / Teen Bowl

I am going to be putting on a Father & Son pigskin tournament this Father’s Day. After church on a Sunday afternoon in June, I invite the fathers to play flag football. Parents against teens, or if you want teens and parents combined. Either way it keeps them active (something very important for guys) and gives them time to spend alone. At half time, have a speaker deliver the positives on the Father-Son relationship. Then make the connection of our relationship with Christ. Maybe if finances allow, bring in a pro? Either way the goal is for unity and growth between fathers and sons!

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Secret Service

Involve parents in youth ministry without requiring the normal rigors of volunteer leadership. Try Parents in Secret Service. Recruit a group of parents to act as secret encouragers for your kids. Give each parent a portion of the names on your youth group roll and gave the spend six months anonymously affirming their assigned kids. Parents can send encouraging notes, leave small surprise gifts at youth meetings or send balloons on birthdays. At the end of the 6 months, have a servants-revealed party where kids meet their secret encouragers and express their appreciation. *** I bet baked goods would be very welcome!

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Parent/Teen Night

In the beginning of the school year in September we had our second parent/teen night of the year. Here are some things that we did that made it special and enabled us to connect more deeply with the parents and teens. 1) Special homemade invitations were sent to every family in the church that had a teen who comes or could come to the youth nights 2) We involved the Senior Pastor for the night during the challenge/talk time (I spoke to the teens, he spoke to the parents) 3) A theme was attached to the whole night, e.g. “The Treasure Chest” 4) Have a mixed praise and worship time (youth songs and adult church songs) 5) Have a crowdbreaker that involves the parents and teens working together 6) Have freebies to giveaway that a family or a teen could use (cd’s, gift cert to a fancy restaurant, etc.) 7) Include in your fellowship time a warmly decorated area in the church where you can serve up snacks and drinks 8) Call up places like Starbucks Coffee to donate their services (They do it!) This is all worth it in our effort as youth pastors and leaders to minister to the families we come in contact with every week.
God bless!

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Teen / Parent Forum

Since parents and teens have trouble understanding each other, we thought of this: We’re going to have a parent/teen forum. We’ll take 4 kids and 4 parents (all unrelated). Then we’ll pose them Q’s for them to answer and discuss. Q’s like: “Why don’t teens and parents talk to each other?” They’ll discuss it, and both parents and teens will begin to understand each other better. We plan on holding a forum with different sets of people every Sunday night for a month. Then we might have them meet together in small groups to discuss things some more.
Ed. Note: Depending on the questions and their seriousness, maybe try doing something like a TV talkshow atmosphere to keep everyone listening and involved… but please… no Jerry. 🙂

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Parent/Teen Night

In the beginning of the school year in September we had our second parent/teen night of the year. Here are some things that we did that made it special and enabled us to connect more deeply with the parents and teens. 1) Special homemade invitations were sent to every family in the church that had a teen who comes or could come to the youth nights. 2) We involved the Senior Pastor for the night during the challenge/talk time (I spoke to the teens, he spoke to the parents). 3) A theme was attached to the whole night, e.g. “The Treasure Chest.” 4) Have a mixed praise and worship time (youth songs and adult church songs). 5) Have a crowdbreaker that involves the parents and teens working together. 6) Have freebies to giveaway that a family or a teen could use (cd’s, gift cert to a fancy restaurant, etc.) 7) Include in your fellowship time a warmly decorated area in the church where you can serve up snacks and drinks. 8) Call up places like Starbucks Coffee to donate their services (They do it!) This is all worth it in our effort as youth pastors and leaders to minister to the families we come in contact with every week.

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Valentine’s Day Dine Out

Have youth plan a Valentine’s Day Dine Out for their parents. Incorporate some of these ideas into the event: 1.) Decorate with red and white streamers and balloons. For placemat, cut 3 inch red construction paper hearts and glue them to the corners of white construction paper. 2.) Have kids cook and serve the meal. Pick an easy menu, such as spaghetti. It’s not only easy to prepare, it’s RED! 3.) Have group members prepare skits, songs, poems, or raps that affirm parents. 4.) Have kids each offer a goofy door prize for their parents, such as a hammer to dad who fixes things well, or Tinkertoys to a mom who likes to play. 5.) Ask group members to each write a “Top 10” things they appreciate about their parents. Have them give their parents the list.

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Parent/Teen Banquet

At the end of the school year we have an annual banquet for the youth group. All the food is cooked and served by the teenagers to the parents. We then have a presentation of awards. Some awards are serious for bowling, putt-putt tournaments, etc. Other awards are goofy in nature; for example we have given out a gold album (record painted gold) to someone who is always singing. We also have a computer presentation of pictures from the past years youth events, with comedic commentary of course!

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